Entrepreneur

Barbara Corcoran on Thinking Big: Highlights from Entrepreneur’s Ready to Launch Event

Last Tuesday, hundreds attended Entrepreneur’s Ready to Launch event, a special conference for those looking to grow a business and make it thrive. The day-long series of panels and speeches featured a power-packed lineup that included Shark Tank star Barbara Corcoran as well as thought leaders on topics such as innovation and finance.

If you didn’t have a chance to attend the event last week, we’ll be sharing highlights throughout the coming months to inspire and inform you. Until then, check out these pearls of wisdom on thinking big.

-Shark Tank’s Barbara Corcoran on the importance of empire building: “When you’re a brand, everyone starts to want to work for you. Everything gets easier. It’s like greasing the whole operation.”

-Trevor Owens, author of The Lean Enterprise: How Corporations Can Innovate Like Startups (Wiley, 2014), on the importance of not setting limits: “A startup is not a small version of a big company.”  

For more motivation, check out this short highlight video.  

Original post here

8 Writing Rules for Entrepreneurs
There are two kinds of people: Those who think they can write, and those who think they can’t. Very often, both are wrong. The truth is this: Writing well is part habit, part knowledge and part giving a damn.
But, you may be asking, who cares about writing anymore? In a world dominated by the short and snappy—click-bait headlines, tweets, Instagram, GIFs, Vine, Snapchat and YOLO and LOL—it might seem pedantic to focus on quality writing.
In fact, writing matters more now, not less. Business is driven by online content, and words are our emissaries. They tell our customers who we are.
Yet so often, they are overlooked. Think of it this way: If your website did not have its visual branding in place, would a visitor recognize it as yours?
Are you telling your story from your unique perspective, with a voice and style that’s clearly all you? You should be.
Here are eight rules to help you hone your writing voice on your website, blog and social channels.
1. Use real words. Is your website or blog littered with revolutionary, value-added, impactful, cutting-edge, best-of-breed, mission-critical words designed to leverage and synergize the current paradigm? Words like that are the chemical additives of business writing: Maybe one or two used sparingly won’t matter much, but too many will poison your content. Forget the buzzwords, and say what you really mean.
2. Avoid frankenwords, weblish and words pretending to be something they’re not. Frankenwords are words weirdly bolted together to create stiff, bizarre versions of themselves, typically ending in -ize or -ism or -istic (incentivize, bucketize). Avoid nouns masquerading as verbs (workshopping, journaling) and verbs masquerading as nouns (learnings). And definitely avoid weblish like k thx ur welcome.
3. Use the active voice. The passive voice isn’t technically incorrect, but it tends to sound stilted and awkward. You’ll vastly improve your writing by making your verbs active. Active sounds zippier and more alive.
Read more » 
(photo by Sergey Zolkin)

8 Writing Rules for Entrepreneurs

There are two kinds of people: Those who think they can write, and those who think they can’t. Very often, both are wrong. The truth is this: Writing well is part habit, part knowledge and part giving a damn.

But, you may be asking, who cares about writing anymore? In a world dominated by the short and snappy—click-bait headlines, tweets, Instagram, GIFs, Vine, Snapchat and YOLO and LOL—it might seem pedantic to focus on quality writing.

In fact, writing matters more now, not less. Business is driven by online content, and words are our emissaries. They tell our customers who we are.

Yet so often, they are overlooked. Think of it this way: If your website did not have its visual branding in place, would a visitor recognize it as yours?

Are you telling your story from your unique perspective, with a voice and style that’s clearly all you? You should be.

Here are eight rules to help you hone your writing voice on your website, blog and social channels.

1. Use real words. Is your website or blog littered with revolutionary, value-added, impactful, cutting-edge, best-of-breed, mission-critical words designed to leverage and synergize the current paradigm? Words like that are the chemical additives of business writing: Maybe one or two used sparingly won’t matter much, but too many will poison your content. Forget the buzzwords, and say what you really mean.

2. Avoid frankenwords, weblish and words pretending to be something they’re not. Frankenwords are words weirdly bolted together to create stiff, bizarre versions of themselves, typically ending in -ize or -ism or -istic (incentivize, bucketize). Avoid nouns masquerading as verbs (workshopping, journaling) and verbs masquerading as nouns (learnings). And definitely avoid weblish like k thx ur welcome.

3. Use the active voice. The passive voice isn’t technically incorrect, but it tends to sound stilted and awkward. You’ll vastly improve your writing by making your verbs active. Active sounds zippier and more alive.

Read more » 

(photo by Sergey Zolkin)

Richard Branson Announces Unlimited Vacation Policy for Virgin Staffers

Shark Tank star Kevin O’Leary, best known as “Mr. Wonderful,” told his kids early and often the cold, hard truth about money: It doesn’t grow on trees and it isn’t free. He’s also not leaving them any in his will.
“I put their nose in [money],” he told Entrepreneur.com. “It’s like training a puppy.”
The mutual funds magnate began teaching his son, Trevor, and his daughter, Savannah, the importance of respecting money at the tender age of 5, just as his mom did. (His mother also gave him a $10,000 seed investment to kickstart SoftKey International from his Toronto basement back in 1983. The firm, which eventually became The Learning Company, was bought by Mattel in 1998 for $3.6 billion, though it quickly proved to be a bad move for the toy maker.)
Teaching kids to be fiscally wise is a parental responsibility O’Leary takes very seriously and one he believes too many parents slack off on. “You have to introduce money into the family as a family member because it is. It’s a member of your family.” The shrewd and sometimes controversial self-made millionaire said he forces his kids to save “10 percent of all the gifts they’ve ever gotten and it’s sitting in an account and trust until they turn 18.”
Read more » 

Shark Tank star Kevin O’Leary, best known as “Mr. Wonderful,” told his kids early and often the cold, hard truth about money: It doesn’t grow on trees and it isn’t free. He’s also not leaving them any in his will.

“I put their nose in [money],” he told Entrepreneur.com. “It’s like training a puppy.”

The mutual funds magnate began teaching his son, Trevor, and his daughter, Savannah, the importance of respecting money at the tender age of 5, just as his mom did. (His mother also gave him a $10,000 seed investment to kickstart SoftKey International from his Toronto basement back in 1983. The firm, which eventually became The Learning Company, was bought by Mattel in 1998 for $3.6 billion, though it quickly proved to be a bad move for the toy maker.)

Teaching kids to be fiscally wise is a parental responsibility O’Leary takes very seriously and one he believes too many parents slack off on. “You have to introduce money into the family as a family member because it is. It’s a member of your family.” The shrewd and sometimes controversial self-made millionaire said he forces his kids to save “10 percent of all the gifts they’ve ever gotten and it’s sitting in an account and trust until they turn 18.”

Read more » 

Watch Our Live Stream of Barbara Corcoran at Entrepreneur’s Exclusive Entrepreneurship Event

Check in with our live stream of Ready to Launch throughout the day for tips, tricks and inspiration. 

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How to Avoid People Who Will Do Nothing But Waste Your Time

The world is built of two different types of people: Those that talk and those that execute — I call the latter doers.

It shouldn’t come as much of a shock that entrepreneurs tend to operate on the side of doers, as executing is a make-or-break aspect of building any business. Yet it always amazes me when we come across people that are so highly capable of a lot of talking, and not a lot of doing. As an entrepreneur, the hard part comes when you have to rely on other people to execute, regardless of whether they do a lot of talking.

This problem isn’t limited to employees. In fact, it isn’t limited to anyone. You’ll find yourself in this predicament with your suppliers, contractors, partners and even clients and customers — all of which produce similar outcomes: A lot of wasted time.

The hardest part about this problem is that you need to be adept at quickly determining whether you’re working with a talker or a doer — after all, you can waste a lot of both time and money, neither of which are likely in abundance.

So how do you train yourself to recognize and separate the talkers from the doers? Let’s look at two main points so you don’t waste your limited time.

Read more » 

Former Apple CEO John Sculley says it’s all about the customer, not the competition. 

Read on »

Tasty Turnaround: How Restaurant Chain Dig Inn Wants to Change the Way America Eats

The Empact100 list is out. The annual list selects 100 startups that should be on everyone’s radar. We took it even further and narrowed it down to the 30 you should know. 

Click here for the list » 

(Photos from top to bottom: Fueled, Hotels for Hope, Loverly, Soapbox Soaps)

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Why are you seeing all those “spirals of death” on your Tumblr dashboard? Read on for more.